Ben Marshall

WordPress Zero Spam Plugin

WordPress Zero Spam Plugin

Introduction

WordPress Zero Spam Plugin

WordPress Zero Spam Plugin

Why should your users prove that they’re humans by filling out captchas? Let bots prove their not bots with the WordPress Zero Spam plugin.

WordPress Zero Spam blocks registration spam and spam in comments automatically without any additional config or setup. Just install, activate and enjoy a spam-free site.

Zero Spam was initially built based on the work by David Walsh.

Major features in WordPress Zero Spam include:

  • No captcha, because spam is not users’ problem
  • No moderation queues, because spam is not administrators’ problem
  • Blocks spam registrations & comments with the use of JavaScript
  • Extend the plugin with action hooks

Languages: English

If you have suggestions for a new add-on, feel free to email me at me@benmarshall.me. Want regular updates? Follow me on Twitter or visit my blog.

Download Now (Version 1.4.0) Fork on GitHub WordPress Repo


Changelog

1.4.0

  • Added `zero_spam_found_spam_comment` and `zero_spam_found_spam_registration` action hooks (thanks @tangrufus)
  • Minor updates to the readme file

1.3.1 – 1.3.3

  • Minor fixes to WP SVN repo

1.3.0

  • Removed Grunt creation of the trunk directory
  • Added spam detection script to registration form

1.2.1

  • Fixed some typos in the readme.txt file

1.2.0

  • Removed testing for core function testing
  • Fix for adding comments from admin (thanks @afragen)
  • Removed unneeded WP svn trunk and tags folders from the git repo (thanks @afragen)

1.1.0

  • Updated theme documentation.
  • WordPress generator meta tag removed to help hide WordPress sites from spambots.

1.0.0

  • Initial release.

Comments
user

Author Marion

Posted at 9:04 am July 22, 2014.

A few ideas to help deter bots.

1) When the plugin is activated make a random string and use it as the name of the field to check against. This would require the bot to change it’s attack per WP install to bypass the field.

2) Require the REQUEST_METHOD to be POST

Reply
user

Author Lucas Karpiuk (@karpstrucking)

Posted at 6:31 am July 24, 2014.

I came to make a similar suggestion as Marion. Is there a github available for contributions?

Reply
    user

    Author Ben Marshall

    Posted at 7:41 am July 24, 2014.
      user

      Author Marion

      Posted at 8:25 am July 24, 2014.

      I actually added these mods after I downloaded the plugin, but where I ran into the snag was in getting the random field name back into the JavaScript.

      I had not seen the code before I made the suggestions. The biggest looming issue is how to get the random field name into the form on submit w/o broadcasting its name back in the code before it’s triggered?

      I’ve thought of a few ways to eloquently get the random field where it needs to be, but once it’s in the source code, all a bot has to do is search for the known file name extract the field name, and then all we’ve done is wasted our time.

      I keep thinking the resolution to this is an AJAX request on the form fields, but then I start thinking about too many things that could go wrong w/ that… and then I get indecisive.

      Reply
user

Author sstern

Posted at 9:34 am July 24, 2014.

I’ve installed on my site, on which Akismet was marking about 40 comments/day as spam. Since installation, either no one has tried to comment or all that spam is just being blocked.

Reply
    user

    Author Marion

    Posted at 9:59 am July 24, 2014.

    A simple test would be to make a comment while you’re not logged in, and confirm it’s working. Then find how to disable JavaScript in your browser of choice and try to comment again. With JavaScript disabled you should see the failure message.

    Reply
      user

      Author sstern

      Posted at 10:22 am July 24, 2014.

      Thanks. it works! (And boy oh boy, does my site fail badly with js turned off.0

      Reply
user

Author Tom McGee

Posted at 10:26 am July 30, 2014.

I noticed that it blocks comments I make myself from the WordPress admin screens, both the post-edit screen and the comments-reply panels. When I temporarily disabled the plugin, I was able to comment.

Reply
    user

    Author Ben Marshall

    Posted at 10:16 am August 12, 2014.

    This will be fixed in the next release.

    Reply
user

Author Christoph Weber

Posted at 5:15 pm July 30, 2014.

Would be nice if this slim plugin could be extended to other forms without adding much bulk. Contact form comes to mind.

Reply
    user

    Author Ben Marshall

    Posted at 9:02 am August 18, 2014.

    Hooks will be included in the next release to enable the ability to extend the plugin.

    Reply
user

Author rauf

Posted at 1:55 am September 16, 2014.

Great Plugin. A Big relief from Spam moderation ;)

Reply

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